Use HVAC.com to Find an HVAC Installer in Arizona

Posted by Will Housh on May 31

Arizona’s seven million residents are served by a vast selection of HVAC installers in Arizona who provide the cooling and heating services the state demands. If you don’t already have a trusted contractor, it can be difficult to know who to call – HVAC.com solves that problem for you, through our extensive online contractor directory.

HVAC Companies in Arizona Know the State’s Comfort Needs

When you think Arizona, many think of blistering heat. While it’s true areas of the state experience temps steadily in the 120s, the climate really ranges depending on elevation. Most of the state enjoys a mild winter, but homes and businesses still require a reliable heating system when temperatures do drop.

HVAC companies in Arizona are experienced in developing comfortable indoor climates for homeowners and business owners throughout the state. Working with a skilled professional is your best bet for achieving the indoor comfort you desire, which you can rely upon year-round.

Use HVAC.com to Locate HVAC Installers in Arizona

The HVAC.com contractor directory is a comprehensive, easy-to-use list of local professional HVAC installers in Arizona. We’ve compiled this online directory to make it easier for homeowners and business owners to find reliable HVAC companies in Arizona quickly, when they are in need of heating and cooling services.

Using the HVAC.com contractor directory, you can find HVAC installers in Arizona who serve cities such as:

Certified Contractor HVAC Companies in Arizona

As you browse our online directory of HVAC companies in Arizona, you will see the Certified Contractor seal next to some of the company listings in your search results. This seal tells you that we have pre-screened this company, and they have met our approval. Certified Contractors incorporate industry best practices to deliver quality work for their customers, backed by a superior customer service experience. If you’re not sure which HVAC installer in Arizona to call, we recommend you start with a Certified Contractor.

Find HVAC Installers in Arizona Now

Visit HVAC.com’s Contractor Directory to find HVAC installers in Arizona who serve your area. Search by ZIP code to see local HVAC companies in Arizona who provide the heating, cooling, and indoor air quality services you need.


Source: HVAC.com

HVAC Maintenance Tip: Improve System Airflow

Posted by Will Housh on May 30

Restricted airflow is a major problem for heating and cooling systems. Without proper airflow through the system, equipment can become overheated, stressed and forced to consume excessive energy, and it may not be possible to deliver the conditioned air you need in the home.

HVAC Maintenance Steps to Improve Airflow

Homeowners should perform HVAC maintenance monthly to ensure their systems have access to adequate airflow – it’ll improve your comfort and system efficiency. Here’s what to do:

  • Inspect your air filter, changing it if needed. Most air filters should be changed about every 3 months, but during periods of heavy system use, such as summer and winter months, they may become clogged with contaminants sooner and require changing more frequently. Each month, take a look at your filter – if it’s covered in grey contamination, install a fresh one or clean your replaceable filter. Also, it’s best not to use air filters with a MERV rating of 13 or higher (such as HEPA filters) in residential HVAC systems – these powerful filters may actually restrict airflow through the system. A filter rated MERV 8 to 12 is ideal for superior contaminant removal in residential environments. For added contaminant control and air quality improvement, consider installing a whole home air purification system.
  • Check all vents and grilles inside the home. No furniture, rugs, or other items should be placed on top or in front of them. All vent louvers should be set to open – if you wish to close off unused areas to save energy, installing a zoning system is a smarter solution. Your home’s HVAC system was designed to work optimally with all vents open – closing them can cause air to back up in the system, damaging HVAC components as well as ducting.
  • During summer months, ensure your exterior condenser or heat pump has not become clogged with contaminants. It’s easy for grass clippings to blow up against and cover the fins of the unit, which will restrict air from moving through it. Vegetation growing around the unit can also cause airflow issues. Never store items around your cooling system components. If you wish to build a surround to disguise your equipment, leave proper clearance surrounding the unit to allow for air movement – at least 2 feet.

Duct system issues and ventilation problems may also stand in the way of your HVAC systems receiving adequate airflow. These are best handled by qualified HVAC maintenance professionals who can diagnose airflow issues and perform needed repairs or equipment installations.

Find an HVAC Maintenance Technician Today

HVAC.com’s Contractor Directory is your go-to source for finding local HVAC maintenance pros who will provide expert airflow solutions. Search your ZIP code to find a pro near you now!


Source: HVAC.com

Summer HVAC Maintenance: Smart Thermostat Settings

Posted by Will Housh on May 25

If you haven’t already done so, now is the time to set your programmable thermostat with your summer temperature cooling schedules. Taking a little time now to pre-program your setbacks will allow your thermostat to effortlessly adjust comfort levels in the home as needed all season long.

About Programmable Thermostats

If you don’t already have one, upgrading to a programmable model can be done cost-effectively, and will make a huge difference in your home HVAC energy consumption, when used properly. When used correctly, a programmable thermostat could save you approximately $180 each year, according to ENERGY STAR.

There are many options available when purchasing a programmable thermostat, but you’ll have 3 basic scheduling capabilities to choose from: 7-day, 5+2 day, and 5-1-1 day. These options reference the ability to set different programs every day, for the weekdays versus weekend days, or for the weekdays, Saturday, and Sunday. Most programmable models, regardless of type, allow for 4 temperature adjustments each day – lets learn how to set them optimally.

HVAC Maintenance: Programming Your Thermostat

For many households, this is what a typical schedule will look like.

  • Your first temperature adjustment of the day will be in the morning, when the household starts waking up. Program temperatures to adjust about 15 minutes before you wake up for optimal efficiency and comfort.
  • When the home will be vacated for the day, set temperatures to rise 10 to 15 degrees. Doing so for periods of 8 hours or more can save you 1 percent in energy costs for every degree you set your stat back.
  • About 15 minutes before you’re due home, set the thermostat to return indoor temperatures to your preferred occupied settings.
  • When you go to sleep is another perfect time to set temperatures back as much as you’re comfortable. About 15 minutes after bedtime, set temperatures to rise.

Find HVAC Maintenance Technicians on HVAC.com

Need the help of an HVAC maintenance technician to upgrade or repair your programmable thermostat? Search the HVAC.com Contractor Directory to find qualified, Certified Contractors in your area today.


Source: HVAC.com

Find HVAC Companies in New York

Posted by Will Housh on May 24

The lights of the Big Apple, the natural beauty of Upstate – New York is a diverse and wonderful state. Whether you like the hustle and bustle of the big city, or the calm and seclusion of the woods, New York has something to offer residents with all preferences. About nine million people already call the state home, and dwell in a range of abodes, from country cabins to high-rise condos.

No matter where in New York you’ve made your home, at some point, you’ll need an HVAC installer in New York to keep your home feeling comfortable.

New York Climate

New York City is an urban heat island, with warmer overnight temperatures than the less dense surrounding areas. Outside the city, the majority of the state experiences a humid continental climate. Winter temperatures in inland New York are bitter, averaging below freezing during January and February; along the Atlantic coast, temperatures are milder.

HVAC Installers in New York

There are many HVAC installers in New York, serving residents and business owners throughout the state. Locating one when you’re in need of heating or cooling help can be a challenge – there are so many HVAC companies in New York to choose from, how do you find the right one to meet your needs?

HVAC.com’s extensive online contractor directory is your solution for finding an HVAC installer in New York. Search by your ZIP code, or enter keywords specific to what services you need, or your equipment, and find a list of HVAC companies in New York that can help you!

Through the HVAC.com Contractor Directory, you can locate HVAC installers in New York cities including:

HVAC.com Certified Contractors

When browsing HVAC companies in New York that serve your area, look for the Certified Contractor seal. HVAC.com awards the Certified Contractor designation to HVAC installers in New York who have been pre-screened and met our high standards. We evaluate contractors based on industry knowledge and best practices as well a customer service – we want you to have an easy and rewarding experience when working with the contractors you find through our directory. The Certified Contractor seal makes it easier for you to find pros you can trust.

Get Started Finding HVAC Companies in New York

Ready to find an HVAC installer in New York State serving your area? Visit the HVAC.com Contractor Directory now to start your search.


Source: HVAC.com

HVAC Maintenance Tip: Clearing Condensate Lines

Posted by Will Housh on May 23

Summer is here, and your cooling system will be working heavily to keep your home comfortable over the next few months. The cooling process creates condensation – normally, this exits your system and home without any issues. Occasionally, issues with your drip pan or condensate drain lines may cause water to back up into your home or HVAC equipment.

Spotting HVAC Maintenance Condensation Issues

Water on the floor nearby your air handling unit/evaporator coil is a sign there is a problem with your cooling system’s condensation drain lines. The system will have a drip pan, which is typically located to the bottom of the unit. The drip pan connects to the condensate drain line, which carries water out of the home.

When the drip pan becomes full or clogged, or the condensate line is clogged, water can spill over the drip pan’s edges, onto the floor surrounding the unit. Another sign your condensate lines may be clogged is if no moisture is exiting outdoors.

Musty odors and increasing humidity inside your home are additional signs of a condensate drain system issue. If left untreated, this simple HVAC maintenance issue could lead to serious water damage inside your home.

What Causes this Problem?

Due to the moisture produced by the cooling process combined with airborne contaminants, mold and algae can form in the drip pan. The growth can clog the drip pan, or even rinse into the condensate drain lines causing a clog in the piping.

HVAC Maintenance: Clear Condensate Line Clogs

If you spot any of the tell-tale signs of a condensate line or drip pan clog, the average homeowner is more than capable of clearing simple clogs if confident. To clean your drip pan and condensate lines, follow these steps:

  1. Shut off power to your HVAC system. Turn it off at the thermostat as well as the breaker.
  2. Locate the drip pan, which is typically positioned underneath the interior air handling unit. You may need to remove a sheet metal panel to access it.
  3. If water is present in the drip pan, a clog is likely present in the line. Using a wet/dry vacuum or rags, remove all water from the drip pan.
  4. Remove the drip pan and clean away all mold, algae, and contamination with a mild soap.
  5. Using your wet/dry vacuum, remove clogs from the condensate drain line. At the exterior exit of the line, using your hand create a seal around the line and the vacuum hose. Run the vacuum for one minute, then inspect the canister for clogs. If the vacuum does not clear the clog, you may be able to run a flexible rubber tube through the lines to manually remove the clog. If you cannot free the clog or are not comfortable with these steps, call an HVAC maintenance professional.
  6. Clean the drain lines at the access point. This is usually a T-shaped vent which has a PVC cover. Remove the cover to access the drain. Using distilled vinegar or hot water with a mild dish soap, you can flush out the drain. Leave your solution to soak for 30 minutes, then rinse the lines with clean water. Someone should watch the exterior condensate line exit to ensure water moves through the lines freely.

Find an HVAC Maintenance Pro in Your Area

Not every homeowner is comfortable performing the necessary steps to clear condensate drain line clogs – that’s ok! An HVAC maintenance technician is happy to do it for you, and can provide other solutions to prevent mold and algae growth that cause line clogs.

Use the HVAC.com Contractor Directory to find a local HVAC maintenance professional in your area now!


Source: HVAC.com

Your Summer HVAC Maintenance Guide

Posted by Will Housh on May 18

Just like any critical piece of equipment, your heating and cooling systems require regular HVAC maintenance to keep them running properly. Home and business owners should stay on top of maintenance tasks year-round to improve system performance and efficiency.

Don’t know exactly what to do as far as HVAC maintenance goes? We’ve put together a summer guide that details the exact steps you should take throughout the warmest part of the year to keep your furnace, air conditioner, heat pump, or other HVAC equipment operating smoothly. We’ll start in May and take you through the end of August with the necessary steps.

May

  • Start your air conditioner. Even if the outdoor temperatures aren’t quite hot enough to use the cooling system yet, it’s smart to fire up your system ahead of the season. You’ll be able to identify system start-up issues and other performance issues, such as a lack of cool air or frequent cycling, and have them repaired prior to rising temperatures. This way, your system issues will be resolved before you need to use your air conditioner or heat pump, and you won’t be stuck waiting for repairs when the first hot day of the year rolls around.
  • Set your programmable thermostat schedules for cooling season. Create temperature schedules that fit the occupancy schedules of your home or business. Programmable thermostats may allow for different schedules each day, for the week and weekend, or for the week and each day of the weekend, depending on the model, and typically accommodate up to four temperature adjustments daily. Remember, setting temperatures back 10 to 15 degrees for periods of 8 hours or more can save you one percent on energy costs for every degree you set your thermostat back. Perfect times for setbacks are overnight or during hours your home or business will be unoccupied. Set temperatures to adjust to occupied comfort levels about 15 minutes before the dwelling or building will be occupied to avoid discomfort without wasting energy. During occupied hours, keep everyone comfortable while conserving energy. Keeping the thermostat’s temperature at 78 degrees is optimal for energy efficiency when people are indoors, and will help them stay cool without consuming excessive energy.
  • Check your air filter. During periods of heavy cooling system use, the filter should be inspected monthly to make sure it has not become full of contaminants. You may find it necessary to replace it sooner than the 3-month mark during these times, so have a replacement ready just in case.
  • Inspect all registers and return air grilles in your home to ensure they have not been blocked or shut. These vents should never be blocked, as doing so will restrict airflow through your HVAC systems, which could create performance issues and system overheating. Move all carpets and rugs, furniture, and other items away from vents. Check to see that vent louvers are open; if you wish to shut off cooling to unused areas of your home or building, never close more than 20 percent of the structure’s HVAC vents. If you have many unused areas, consider investing in a zoning system which will allow you to reduce energy waste while facilitating proper HVAC system performance – work with a trusted HVAC contractor to design and install zoning solutions for your home or business.
  • Inspect your exterior cooling equipment. Gently brush away any grass clippings and debris which have gathered on the unit. Trim away vegetation that has grown around the unit. Never store outdoor furniture or other items in the area immediately surrounding the unit.
  • Inspect your cooling system’s drip pan and condensate drain lines for clogs. If these components become clogged with mold or algae growth, condensation from the cooling process cannot exit your home or building properly. This can cause the cooling system to malfunction, or water to back up indoors, causing water damage. If water has backed up, clear clogs within the drip pan or condensate drain lines. Turn off power to the system for safety before doing so. Use a wet/dry vacuum to clear water from the drip pan, or use rags to soak it up. Clean the drip pan using a mild soap. Clear clogs from the condensate drain lines using your wet/dry vacuum.

June

  • Check your air filter. During periods of heavy cooling system use, the filter should be inspected monthly to make sure it has not become full of contaminants. You may find it necessary to replace it sooner than the 3-month mark during these times, so have a replacement ready just in case.
  • Inspect all registers and return air grilles in your home to ensure they have not been blocked or shut. These vents should never be blocked, as doing so will restrict airflow through your HVAC systems, which could create performance issues and system overheating. Move all carpets and rugs, furniture, and other items away from vents. Check to see that vent louvers are open; if you wish to shut off cooling to unused areas of your home or building, never close more than 20 percent of the structure’s HVAC vents. If you have many unused areas, consider investing in a zoning system which will allow you to reduce energy waste while facilitating proper HVAC system performance – work with a trusted HVAC contractor to design and install zoning solutions for your home or business. Inspect your exterior cooling equipment. Gently brush away any grass clippings and debris which have gathered on the unit. Trim away vegetation that has grown around the unit. Never store outdoor furniture or other items in the area immediately surrounding the unit.
  • Inspect your cooling system’s drip pan and condensate drain lines for clogs. If these components become clogged with mold or algae growth, condensation from the cooling process cannot exit your home or building properly. This can cause the cooling system to malfunction, or water to back up indoors, causing water damage. If water has backed up, clear clogs within the drip pan or condensate drain lines. Turn off power to the system for safety before doing so. Use a wet/dry vacuum to clear water from the drip pan, or use rags to soak it up. Clean the drip pan using a mild soap. Clear clogs from the condensate drain lines using your wet/dry vacuum.

July

  • Change your air filter. If you have a disposable filter, remove the old one and insert a clean replacement. If your filter is reusable, wash it according to the manufacturer’s directions and allow it to dry entirely before reinserting it into the filter compartment.
  • Inspect all registers and return air grilles in your home to ensure they have not been blocked or shut. These vents should never be blocked, as doing so will restrict airflow through your HVAC systems, which could create performance issues and system overheating. Move all carpets and rugs, furniture, and other items away from vents. Check to see that vent louvers are open; if you wish to shut off cooling to unused areas of your home or building, never close more than 20 percent of the structure’s HVAC vents. If you have many unused areas, consider investing in a zoning system which will allow you to reduce energy waste while facilitating proper HVAC system performance – work with a trusted HVAC contractor to design and install zoning solutions for your home or business.
  • Inspect your exterior cooling equipment. Gently brush away any grass clippings and debris which have gathered on the unit. Trim away vegetation that has grown around the unit. Never store outdoor furniture or other items in the area immediately surrounding the unit.
  • Inspect your cooling system’s drip pan and condensate drain lines for clogs. If these components become clogged with mold or algae growth, condensation from the cooling process cannot exit your home or building properly. This can cause the cooling system to malfunction, or water to back up indoors, causing water damage.
  • If water has backed up, clear clogs within the drip pan or condensate drain lines. Turn off power to the system for safety before doing so. Use a wet/dry vacuum to clear water from the drip pan, or use rags to soak it up. Clean the drip pan using a mild soap. Clear clogs from the condensate drain lines using your wet/dry vacuum.

August

  • Check your air filter. During periods of heavy cooling system use, the filter should be inspected monthly to make sure it has not become full of contaminants. You may find it necessary to replace it sooner than the 3-month mark during these times, so have a replacement ready just in case.
  • Inspect all registers and return air grilles in your home to ensure they have not been blocked or shut. These vents should never be blocked, as doing so will restrict airflow through your HVAC systems, which could create performance issues and system overheating. Move all carpets and rugs, furniture, and other items away from vents. Check to see that vent louvers are open; if you wish to shut off cooling to unused areas of your home or building, never close more than 20 percent of the structure’s HVAC vents. If you have many unused areas, consider investing in a zoning system which will allow you to reduce energy waste while facilitating proper HVAC system performance – work with a trusted HVAC contractor to design and install zoning solutions for your home or business.
  • Inspect your exterior cooling equipment. Gently brush away any grass clippings and debris which have gathered on the unit. Trim away vegetation that has grown around the unit. Never store outdoor furniture or other items in the area immediately surrounding the unit.
  • Inspect your cooling system’s drip pan and condensate drain lines for clogs. If these components become clogged with mold or algae growth, condensation from the cooling process cannot exit your home or building properly. This can cause the cooling system to malfunction, or water to back up indoors, causing water damage. If water has backed up, clear clogs within the drip pan or condensate drain lines. Turn off power to the system for safety before doing so. Use a wet/dry vacuum to clear water from the drip pan, or use rags to soak it up. Clean the drip pan using a mild soap. Clear clogs from the condensate drain lines using your wet/dry vacuum.

Have more questions and don’t have an HVAC contractor to call? Find a local cooling contractor serving your area by searching the HVAC.com Contractor Directory.


Source: HVAC.com

Find HVAC Companies in California

Posted by Will Housh on May 16

Whether you need a new heating or cooling system installed, repairs to your existing equipment, or maintenance to keep your home’s HVAC systems running smoothly, HVAC companies in California are available to assist you.

Approximately 40 million people call California home – it’s the third largest state in the nation, yet the most populated one. HVAC companies in California understand the unique challenges the state’s climate presents, and how to keep California homes and businesses comfortable all year long. HVAC installers in California located in the northern part of the state supply customers with reliable heating and cooling solutions to meet the demands of the varied four seasons, while HVAC companies in California serving the state’s southern areas know the importance of a reliable, high-efficiency air conditioning system or heat pump.

Find HVAC Companies in California on HVAC.com

Start your search for HVAC companies in California on HVAC.com. We’ve compiled an extensive contractor directory, full of HVAC installers in California who serve communities throughout the state. Using our contractor directory, it’s easy to locate HVAC companies in California cities including:

Certified Contractor HVAC Companies in California

When you enter your ZIP code into our contractor database, you’ll receive a list of results, detailing HVAC • installers in California, their contact information, and the services they provide. Next to some of the listings, you’ll also see our Certified Contractor seal.

If you’re looking to work with an HVAC company in California who offers reliable workmanship and an inviting customer service experience, look for the Certified Contractor seal. HVAC.com has pre-screened these contractors and found they meet our high standards for the experience customers like you want – they utilize industry best practices to deliver high-caliber work, while treating you to a fantastic customer service experience throughout your journey.

Find an HVAC Installer in California Today

HVAC.com makes it easy for homeowners to find HVAC installers in California. Search our online Contractor Directory today for a list of HVAC companies in California who serve your area.


Source: HVAC.com

Your Guide to Emergency Air Conditioning Repairs

Posted by Will Housh on May 10

It may happen to you at some point this summer – your air conditioner quits working. Or maybe it’s still running, but you’re feeling no cool air indoors.

No air conditioning on the hottest of days can incite a panic in homeowners, but try to keep your cool. Emergency air conditioner repairs can be performed quickly, to restore your indoor comfort. If your air conditioner stops cooling, follow this guide for emergency air conditioning repairs.

Step 1: Try Air Conditioner Troubleshooting

Did you know that sometimes, what we assume to be a serious emergency air conditioner repair can actually be solved with some simple troubleshooting?

Cooling system issues may seem like an emergency, especially if you aren’t familiar with the ins and outs of HVAC equipment. Cooling system troubleshooting steps can be performed by most any homeowner – sometimes, your emergency air conditioner repairs may be solved with the flip of a switch or a filter change.

Before calling a technician for emergency air conditioner repairs, check out our Air Conditioner Troubleshooting Guide. These fixes could restore cooling sooner and save you an expensive emergency repair bill.

Step 2: Shut Down Your System

If your air conditioner isn’t cooling, or is experiencing another performance issue, shut it off. Don’t continue to operate a malfunctioning air conditioner, as that may worsen the problem at hand. This is one reason we do preventative maintenance checks pre-season – a technician identifies and corrects problems, so you don’t run your system with faulty components, causing more damage.

Shut your air conditioner down when performance issues arise. These include lack of cooling, no airflow, sudden system noises, or even outrageous energy bills. Shutting the system down will prevent further damage. Operating your system with performance issues could exacerbate the problem, even wrecking your system beyond repair.

Step 3: Call for Emergency Air Conditioner Repairs

If troubleshooting the system doesn’t work, shut down your air conditioner and call a trusted HVAC contractor. Most cooling companies offer emergency repair service, and can dispatch a technician to solve your air conditioner issues quickly. An after-hours service call will likely cost you a premium – some homeowners may choose to wait until the next available service time to avoid the cost. This isn’t always an option when outdoor temperatures are soaring and your home is heating up.

Find an Emergency Air Conditioner Repair Company

Find an emergency air conditioning repair technician quickly, using the HVAC.com online contractor directory. Search by ZIP code to find HVAC contractors in your area. Look for the Certified Contractor seal, which shows you this company has met HVAC.com’s strict standards for quality workmanship and customer service.


Source: HVAC.com

Air Conditioning Service Calls for Residential Cooling Systems

Posted by Will Housh on May 9

If you’ve never had the misfortune of experiencing a cooling system breakdown, you may be unfamiliar with air conditioning service. It’s likely at some point in your life, you will need to work with an HVAC technician – if you’ve never done so before, this can be slightly intimidating for some.

HVAC technicians never want you to be uncomfortable or intimidated when calling upon them for air conditioning service. They understand that many homeowners are unfamiliar with HVAC systems and will have questions.

For your own assurance, it may help you to familiarize yourself with the air conditioning service call process before you meet with your contractor. We’ve outlined the general process below so you’ll know what to expect.

Calling for Air Conditioner Service

When you call an HVAC company for air conditioner service, you’ll likely be speaking with a dispatcher or a member of their office staff. The staff member will ask your contact information. They’ll ask about the cooling system issue you’re facing – it’s ok if you haven’t identified the source of the problem, just provide the information you have.

The dispatcher may ask for information about your cooling system, such as the manufacturer, model number, and size. You may not have this information memorized, but it can be easy to locate by looking at the labels on your cooling equipment. Check our blog below for information on how to decode the information you find on your unit.

Understanding air conditioner labels: https://www.hvac.com/blog/understanding-air-conditioning-system-doesnt-scary.

Lastly, they’ll schedule a time for a technician to visit your home, diagnose your system issue, and perform air conditioning service.

Common Air Conditioner Terms

Before your technician arrives for air conditioner service, it may make you more comfortable to familiarize yourself with some of the HVAC industry terms they may use.

Check out our infographic which explains ten common HVAC terms you may hear during your service call: https://www.hvac.com/blog/ten-common-hvac-terms.

Some other terms your technician may mention when discussing air conditioner service involve the unit’s efficiency. SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) is the efficiency measure used for air conditioners. If your cooling system is a heat pump, your technician may refer to the HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor) as well, though a heat pump’s cooling efficiency is also measured in SEER.

Your Air Conditioner Service Call

When your air conditioner technician arrives, show them to your cooling equipment. Let them know where the indoor components can be accessed – they may need to evaluate your air handler, which is typically located with your furnace. Also, show them where the home’s thermostat is located, or if your home is zoned, give them an overview about how your home is divided into zones. Give them access to the outdoor condenser unit, which in some cases within a locked and fenced back yard.

Your technician will spend some time evaluating the system, possibly performing some tests. Once the technician has diagnosed the problem, they’ll report to you with the issue your system faces and an estimate of costs and time to repair your air conditioner. At this time, feel free to ask any questions you may have – your technician is there to help you better understand your system and become comfortable with the work it needs.

Performing Air Conditioner Service

Many air conditioner repairs can be performed right away. Sometimes, special parts may need to be ordered, or the technician may have to return to the shop to gather appropriate materials. If your air conditioner service cannot be performed immediately, the technician or an office staff member will schedule a time for the technician to return.

If air conditioner service can be completed the same day, your technician will get to work once they have your approval to complete the needed repairs. They’ll perform the work, and test the system to ensure their fix has solved the issues you face. The technician should check in with you to let you know the work is completed and they’ll be leaving, so you can inspect it if necessary and secure your home and equipment.

All HVAC companies have different procedures for payment. Your technician may accept payment, or inform you that an invoice will be sent. Once you’re satisfied with the air conditioner service that’s been performed, your technician will leave the home.

Finding an Air Conditioner Service Technician

Ready to find a trustworthy technician to tackle your air conditioner service? Check HVAC.com’s Contractor Directory to find a local HVAC service company. Enter your ZIP code and you’ll be able to view all contractors in your area. Look for the Certified Contractor seal next to a contractor’s listing, which lets you know this company has been pre-screened and meets our rigorous standards for workmanship and customer service.


Source: HVAC.com

Air Conditioner Fixes for Homeowners

Posted by Will Housh on May 4

When your air conditioner starts making a strange noise, or stops working altogether, it’s easy to panic. Many homeowners don’t possess a detailed knowledge of cooling systems, which can make tackling an air conditioner fix more intimidating.

The truth is, not every HVAC issue requires professional help. In some cases, the air conditioner fix can be performed by the average user – as long as you know what to do. Below are some common cooling system issues that may arise this summer, as well as the air conditioner fixes that can get your equipment running smoothly again, without the expensive repair bill.

Air Conditioner Fix: AC won’t turn on

An air conditioner that won’t start up on a hot day can certainly make you sweat. Before you find an HVAC contractor, troubleshoot the system yourself – the issue causing your system not to start could be a simple air conditioner fix.

Check the Thermostat Settings

If your thermostat is adjusted without your knowledge, the settings may not be correct to call for cooling.

  • Make sure the unit has power. Replace the batteries with fresh ones. If your thermostat is hardwired to the home’s electrical system, check the breaker to ensure it has not been tripped, cutting off power to the thermostat.
  • Check the settings. Your thermostat should be set to cooling mode. The temperature should be set below the home’s current temperature to trigger the air conditioner to start up. On programmable models, make sure the hold or vacation mode has not been activated, pausing your active settings.

Check the Power

An air conditioner that won’t turn on could easily be caused by lack of power. Check your unit’s power sources prior to calling a contractor for an air conditioner fix.

  • Check the exterior unit to ensure it is plugged in, and the exterior switch near the condenser should be set to ‘on’.
  • Go to your home’s electrical panel. Ensure the breakers powering the air conditioner’s condenser and air handler are not tripped and are functioning correctly.

Check the Air Filter

A clogged air filter could prevent the cooling system from firing up. Clogged filters limit airflow through the system, which can cause it to overheat. The system’s safety controls may trigger the system to shut down in order to protect it from damage.

Replace your dirty air filter with a new one, or give your reusable filter a good cleaning. Insert the filter properly, and give your system some time to cool down if it just recently stopped coming on.

Air Conditioner Fix: No cool air

While your air conditioner may be turning on, if it’s not blowing cool air, it’s not doing you any good. Some simple-to-solve issues could be causing your lack of cool air.

Check the Air Filter

Once again, the air filter could be to blame for your air conditioning system issue. If the filter is blocked, restricting airflow, not enough cooled air will travel through the ducts into your home. You’ll feel some air coming through your vents, but it may not be as cool as you expect.

Replace your clogged air filter with a new disposable one, or clean your reusable filter according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Reinsert the filter in the appropriate direction.

Check the Ducts

Duct leaks allow cool air to exit the duct system before entering your home. You may feel air coming through your registers, but since up to 30 percent of energy can be lost through duct leaks, that air may not be cool.

If your ducts are accessible, inspect for disconnected sections, holes, and gaps. While some homeowners prefer to work with an HVAC contractor for duct issues, you may feel comfortable sealing minor leaks on your own.

Duct tape is not the answer! Duct tape delaminates, losing its sealing ability quickly. The proper sealant for duct leaks in duct joints is mastic. Duct joints should be secured with sheet metal screws, then mastic is applied across the duct seams, sealing the holes that allow air to leak out.

Air Conditioner Fix: Call the contractor

When an easy air conditioner fix doesn’t do the trick, you need the experience and know-how of a true HVAC pro. HVAC.com connects homeowners to local cooling contractors who’ll perform the expert air conditioner fix your system needs to run smoothly throughout the summer.

Search our Online Directory to find an HVAC.com Certified Contractor in your area.


Source: HVAC.com